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5 Things nobody tells you about selling your home

5 Things nobody tells you about selling your home

If it’s the first time you’re selling a home there are a number of things, from the preparation of your home for sale to dealing with paperwork and negotiations, to take into consideration.


Here are a few things you may not have considered.

It’s important to hire a professional photographer

Unless you are a professional interior photographer, I would strongly recommend that you get professional photos and video taken of your home before listing your property.


According to the Center for Realtor Development, in an article published by RIS Media, ‘homes with high quality photography sell 32 percent faster’ and ‘homes with more photos sell faster, too.’


Professional real estate photographers know how to use lighting and scale to highlight the best features of your home and professional videographers give people the option of doing a ‘walkthrough’ of your house from their phone or computer. If the home is not suitable for the potential buyer’s needs, he or she may be able to make a decision and rule it out without having to waste your time by viewing an unsuitable home. 


On the other hand, the professional photos and video are curated in a manner to evoke positive emotion and draw people to your home. This can get potential buyers excited before they even set foot on the property.


At Berkshire Hathaway, we offer professional photography and videography as an added-value service (at no extra cost), so that you have the best chance to sell your home in the shortest amount of time.


You may need storage space

Not many people live in a space that always looks like it belongs in an interior-design magazine. However, that’s the look that will help sell your home and in order to declutter and depersonalize your house to make it more appealing to buyers, you’re quite possibly going to need storage space.


If you have another home, garage, or a family member or friend with spare garage space, utilize that. To help declutter your space it’s a good idea to have  a yard or garage sale before listing your home, or you could donate unwanted furniture and belongings to a charity of your choice. Your realtor will help you assess what large items in the home would be better to move out and how best to stage your house. This may include hiring or buying a few items to make your home look more appealing too.


Clutter can also be a real turn off to buyers. It’s a good idea to fill storage boxes with things that you don’t need or use regularly (perhaps you have lots of books standing on top of a bulging bookshelf that can be packed away) and store them off site. Alternatively, you could buy a few decorative boxes that will suit your decor, so that you can quickly tidy up the things you use everyday before each showing.


Your pets can be a problem


Your pets are part of your family and you’ve probably gotten used to any mess associated with keeping animals and become desensitized to the smell of your pets too. Unfortunately, even animal lovers can be put off by pet hair on the beds and furniture, unkempt birdcages and a house that smells of dogs, cats, guinea pigs or another creature. Potential buyers may be even less tolerant if they are not animal lovers, or are allergic.


Some tips to overcome this include airing your house well, especially before showings, cleaning your carpets, bedding, upholstery and curtains and then keeping your pets away from these. Buy an odor-neutralizing product from a pet supply store or use a home-made solution to eliminate smells. You can also place diffuzers with essential oils in strategic parts of your home. 


If your cat uses a litter box, you’ll need to clean this and pack it away for showings and if your dog makes use of pee pads, make sure to get rid of these too.


The renovations you’ve done may not have added as much value as you believe

Watching Love it or List it, Fixer Upper, or another home improvement show, may have led you to believe that if you’ve spent $10 000 on renovations, you can make back double that when you sell. The truth is that renovations don’t necessarily make you money. In fact they often don’t, but they can help to make your place more saleable. That’s why it’s important to speak to an experienced realtor about which home renovations offer some return before doing them.


For instance if you’ve added a pool, thinking that this will surely push up the sales price your view may not be shared by all buyers. Some buyers will see a pool as a white elephant that will cost them money to maintain and it won’t consider it as a positive addition. Even if having a pool makes the place more appealing to a potential buyer, you won’t necessarily be able to recover the cost of installing it within the sales price.


It’s really important to price your home correctly

If your home is priced correctly from the start, it has a good chance of selling within the first month of listing, if it’s a seller’s market. Buyers who are in the market will be aware of the current listings and will be eagerly waiting for new inventory. If the homes they’ve seen so far haven’t worked for them, they may be hoping that the next house in their price range will be the perfect one.


  • If your house is priced correctly from the start, it will be well positioned to attract the maximum number of buyers who can pay what your home is worth and it will help facilitate a timely sale.

  • If your home is overpriced, you won’t get as many people coming to view your home and if you do get an offer it may be well under the asking price. 

  • If your house is under priced, you could attract lots of potential buyers and offers but you stand to lose on a big investment that you have made in the past. 

Whether the sale is urgent or not, it’s wise to get help from an experienced realtor who can provide a professional market analysis and take your personal needs into consideration when helping you determine the price.

If you’d like help selling your home contact me on swissmissrealtor@gmail.com or call Evelyn on (310) 906-0163.